Jim Garrison was a Patriot and a Revealer

On March 1, 1967, New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison arrested and charged New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw with conspiring to assassinate President Kennedy, with the help of Lee Harvey Oswald, David Ferrie, and others. Dates: Mar 1, 1967 – Mar 1, 1969 – Wikipedia

Perry Russo was an unreliable witness who constantly pressured by both sides and was asked and prepped to create the evidence that would have come from better though at the time of the trial deceased sources but was the best witness available.

Those already deceased: JFK Born: May 29, 1917, Brookline, MA Assassinated: November 22, 1963, Parkland Health, Dallas, TX and his dispute with those who assassinated him. Patsy Lee Harvey Oswald Born: October 18, 1939, New Orleans, LA Assassinated: November 24, 1963, Dallas, TX Jack Ruby Born: March 25, 1911, Chicago, IL Died: January 3, 1967 (age 55 years), Dallas, TX, RFK Born: November 20, 1925, Brookline, MA Assassinated: June 6, 1968, PIH Health Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, CA. Davd Ferrie Born: March 28, 1918, Cleveland, OH Died: February 22, 1967 (age 48 years), New Orleans, LA all of whom had knowledge of the CIA Deep State operating out of Guy Bannister’s office using Lee Harvey Oswald. Born: March 7, 1901, Monroe, LA Guy Bannister -Died: June 6, 1964 (age 63 years), New Orleans, LA

Trying at law a group of dead conspirators where were working together in tight secret enterprise is impossible but trying the matter before history easier of time as more comes out from the paper trail, etc.,

RFK,, JM/WAVE and NSC Augmented is what the assasination pertained to and INternational Trade Mart, United Fruit Co., Zapata Patroleum and others operating from New Orleans since the 1920s and even 1902 Reiely Coffee.

JUST ANOTHER DAY AT TULANE AND BROAD (and the courtroom verdict aquitting Clay Shaw

Clarence Darrow lost the Scopes trial—who knows it?
—Jim Garrison

JUST ANOTHER DAY AT Tulane and Broad,” Garrison I quipped as soon as he learned that Clay Shaw had been acquitted. Then in an ironic paraphrase of Lee Harvey Oswald, he added, “Now everyone will know who I am.” He was not emotional, unlike the two of his assistants who had broken down. He spoke, instead, of his sympathy for President Kennedy: “If you happen to get elected president, you must not get the idea that you can with equanimity try to end an eighty billion dollar a year warfare operation.” Kennedy had been “taking steps to end the Cold War,” Garrison believed. Nor was the culprit the CIA alone. In implementing the assassination, the CIA was functioning as “the clandestine arm of the warfare interests in the United States government.”

The investigation had cost, by his records, $99,488.96, of which he had personally donated $ 15,875.

The jury told Mark Lane they had agreed that there had been a conspiracy, with the United States government a participant. There was a good chance of Clay Shaw’s having been involved. But there was also reasonable doubt. The two alternates said they would have voted to convict. Garrison concluded that it was not possible to expose “a sophisticated clandestine operation in an Anglo-Saxon courtroom.” It had been like “trying to carry water in a sieve.

Walter Sheridan and Perry Russo retrieved from Wikipedia and copied or modified to here

Perry Russo as Friend of David Ferrie

Russo was an insurance salesman from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He attended Tulane University, received a bachelor’s degree from Loyola University New Orleans in 1964, and attended one year of law school at Loyola.[2][3] He moved away from New Orleans in September 1965.[3] Russo came forward after his friend David Ferrie died on February 22, 1967, while being investigated by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison in regard to Kennedy’s death. In four television and newspaper interviews that Russo gave,[4] he talked at length about Ferrie. He said that Ferrie had told him about a month before the assassination: “We will get him, and it won’t be long,” and on another occasion, “You know we can get Kennedy if we want him.”

Russo said nothing in the interviews about Oswald, Shaw, or a conspiracy.[5] When a television reporter asked him on February 24 if Ferrie had ever mentioned Oswald’s name, Russo said, “No. I had never heard of Oswald until the television [coverage] of the assassination.”[6]

However, when he was interviewed by Garrison’s office on February 27, Russo described a roommate of Ferrie’s in New Orleans as having “sort of dirty blond hair and a husky beard … a typical beatnik, extremely dirty.” When Russo was shown a picture of Oswald, he said that Oswald was the person whom Ferrie had introduced to him as his roommate sometime between May and October 1963.[7] When shown a picture of Shaw, Russo said he saw him and Ferrie talking in a car at Ferrie’s service station. But still Russo said nothing about Shaw or Oswald conspiring with Ferrie to murder Kennedy.[8] Russo added that if he were hypnotized he may have total recall on names and places and dates.

Garrison arranged to have Russo interrogated three times while hypnotized, the first time while also under an injection of sodium thiopental, known popularly as “truth serum”. Now Russo described a conspiracy plot, with Shaw (using the alias “Bertrand”) and a rifle-toting “Leon” Oswald at Ferrie’s apartment when Russo was visiting in mid-September 1963. Russo said Ferrie told him, “We are going to kill John F. Kennedy” and “it won’t be long.”[9]

Testimony against Clay Shaw[edit]

At Shaw’s preliminary hearing on March 15, 1967, Russo repeated the claims he had made under hypnosis. When asked on cross-examination why he had not gone to the authorities two months after the alleged meeting, when Kennedy was assassinated, Russo replied, “I had an involvement with school, which was more pressing to me.”[3]

Russo named two witnesses who could corroborate his story of attending a party at Ferrie’s apartment in September 1963 in which the assassination plot was made. The first, Russo’s former girlfriend, appeared on an NBC News program about the Garrison investigation on June 19, 1967, and denied being at Ferrie’s apartment, and said that she never even met Ferrie until 1965. The second, a friend of Russo’s, told NBC News that he was at Ferrie’s apartment then but saw nobody resembling Oswald or Shaw.[10]

Russo failed two polygraph examinations ordered by Garrison, on March 8 and June 19, and during the second he confessed to the polygraph operator that his story was not true.[11][12] Walter Sheridan, a former FBI agent and aide to Robert F. Kennedy who was investigating the Garrison accusations for NBC News, reported,

“In my conversations with Perry Russo, he has stated that his [preliminary hearing] testimony against Clay Shaw may be a combination of truth, fantasy, and lies. He says he wishes he had never gotten into this, but now he feels he has no choice but to go through with it. He said he’s afraid if he changed his testimony, that Garrison might indict him for perjury . . . Russo said ‘The hell with truth, the hell with justice. You’re asking me to sacrifice myself for Clay Shaw, and I won’t do it.’”[10]

At a press conference with Garrison the day after the NBC broadcast, Russo accused Sheridan of attempting to bribe him into changing his story, and of alternating between promises and threats in seeking his help to “wreck the Garrison investigation.” NBC News denied the allegations, and Sheridan said that Russo had solicited offers from them. George Lardner Jr. of The Washington Post who reported on the story said a week or two earlier that Russo solicited a bribe from him in order to divulge “weaknesses” in his testimony.[13][14]

Garrison had Russo testify two years later at the Clay Shaw trial, which ended in a not-guilty verdict after less than an hour of jury deliberation.

Later life[edit]

In August 1970, Perry Russo and another man were arrested for burglarizing a New Orleans residence, stealing property valued at eight thousand dollars, and being in possession of a stolen safe-deposit key. Garrison’s office declined to prosecute on the burglary and theft charges. Russo pled guilty to possessing the stolen key and was given a three-month suspended sentence.[15][16][17]

In 1971, two years after Shaw’s not-guilty verdict, Russo told one of Shaw’s lawyers that he never saw Shaw at Ferrie’s apartment, and that Garrison’s office had done “a complete brainwashing job” on him.[18][19] In a second, tape-recorded interview with a former Garrison investigator and two of Shaw’s attorneys, Russo spoke of Garrison and his staff telling him before the trial that they had a contract with Life magazine for $25,000, and that “after the Shaw conviction” they would “either give that to me or see somehow that I got a lot of it for my trouble.” Russo also said, “I guess I always knew [Shaw] had nothing to do with anything.”[20] But to others, Russo continued to assert that he had seen Ferrie, Shaw, and Oswald conspiring to kill President Kennedy.[21]

Journalist James Phelan, who covered the Garrison investigation for The Saturday Evening Post, later explained,

Walter James Sheridan (20 November 1925[1] – 13 January 1995)[2][3] was an investigator for various agencies of the US government. He is best known for his role in the prosecution of Jimmy Hoffa, on which subject he published a book in 1972.

Background[edit]

Sheridan was born in 1925 in Utica, New York.[3][4] During World War II, he served in the US Navy’s Submarine Service,[3] and according to some sources worked for the Office of Naval Intelligence.[5] After the war he benefited from the G.I. Bill, graduating from Fordham University in 1950.[1]

Career[edit]

Sheridan joined the Federal Bureau of Investigation, resigning after four years over J. Edgar Hoover‘s focus on anti-Communism.[4] As Sheridan later put it, “Hoover was more interested in guys who were Communists for 15 minutes in 1931 than he was in guys who were stealing New Jersey.[1] Sheridan was then a National Security Agency investigator for three years.[1][4]

Sheridan also was an investigator for the United States Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in Labor and Management, recruited to its staff by Robert F. Kennedy in 1957.[1][2] He was a regional coordinator for John F. Kennedy‘s 1960 presidential campaign, and a coordinator for the Robert F. Kennedy presidential campaign, 1968.[4] After Robert Kennedy was appointed Attorney General in 1961, Sheridan became a special assistant to Kennedy working as the effective chief of a team investigating Hoffa and the Teamsters.[3] From 1965 to 1970, he was an NBC News special correspondent, producing documentaries on crime and gun control among other issues;[4] his unit received a Peabody Award for work on the 1967 Detroit riot.[3] Sheridan also covered the 1967 prosecution of Clay Shaw by Jim Garrison, and in 1967 produced an hour-long special for NBC on the assassination of John F. Kennedy.[6]

In the 1970s and 80s, he was a principal aide to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary and the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee.[4]

In fiction[edit]

Sheridan is among those portrayed in the film Thirteen Days, which is about the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.

Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis is Robert F. Kennedy’s account of the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. The book was released in 1969, the year after his assassination.

Thirteen Days describes the meetings held by the Executive Committee (ExComm), the team assembled by US President John F. Kennedy to handle the tense situation that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union following the discovery of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, 90 miles (140 km) from Florida. Robert Kennedy, who was the US Attorney General at the time, describes his brother John’s leadership style during the crisis as involved, but not controlling. Robert Kennedy viewed the military leaders on the council sympathetically, and recognized that their lifelong concentration on war was difficult to set aside.

In Movies[edit]

Sheridan is mentioned in the documentary The JFK Assassination: The Jim Garrison Tapes (1992) pertaining to his work on the 1967 NBC hour-long special about the assassination of John F. Kennedy.[7]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

The Garrison Tapes: A John Barbour Film

John Barbour’s World

93% liked this 1 hour and 36 minutes movie Google users

This film focuses on New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison, who launched an extensive investigation into President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Garrison’s work led to a much different view on the incident than that of the official Warren Commission report, resulting in ongoing controversy. The documentary features interview footage with Garrison himself, as well as his relatives and other associates, and presents possible theories about who may have been involved in Kennedy’s death.

Mark Lane 1960 New York City Campaign Manager for JFK becomes involved with writing and editorial Leee Harvey Oswald seemed to be a patsy. Oswald’s mother hears of it and wants Lane to represent the family in the wrongful death of Oswald. Practicing attorney Lane is cautious and requires at the start freedom to conduct his own investigation and does finding the underlying conspiracy is identifiable by witness testimony that the Warren Commission provided only window dressing of. Lane and his evidence along with expert Mark Groden and others makeup the dense list of witnesses in the documentary that feature Col L. Fletcher Prouty, Garrison himself, newsreels, and more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ocfr2VdcpU

The interconnected lives of these connected Kennedy Assassination authors with first hand events knowledge as primary sources of themselves

The assertions of Edward Paul Donegan about the Secret Team (by Col Fletcher Prouty) also called the Cabal (by themselves and by Right Wing Nut Jobs) and world history in this book and other books also by him and also by others.

I Edward Paul Donegan will follow the story of Chauncey Marvin Holt, E. Howard Hunt, James Donegan, Col Prouty and the CIA activities of past now being covered up by those who gained power in the assassination of JFK.

Jim Garrison retrieved from Wikipedia and copied or modified to here

James Carothers Garrison (born Earling Carothers Garrison; November 20, 1921 – October 21, 1992)[3] was the District Attorney of Orleans Parish, Louisiana, from 1962 to 1973 and later a Federal Judge for appeals. A member of the Democratic Party, he is best known for his investigations into the assassination of John F. Kennedy and the prosecution of New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to that effect in 1969, which ended in Shaw’s acquittal. He wrote three published books, one of which became a prime source for Oliver Stone‘s film JFK in 1991, in which Garrison was portrayed by actor Kevin Costner, while Garrison himself made a cameo appearance as Earl Warren. Garrison previously appeared titled as himself in the 1987 film Big Easy, a plot set in his own hometown of New Orleans.

Early life and career[edit]

Garrison was born in Denison, Iowa, in 1921.[4][5][6] He was the first child and only son of Earling R. Garrison and Jane Anne Robinson who divorced when he was two years old.[3] His family moved to New Orleans quite early into his childhood, where he was raised by his divorced mother. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II, having joined the year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. After the war he obtained a law degree from Tulane University Law School in 1949. He then worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for two years where he was stationed with the Seattle office.[7] Leading up to the Korean War era, Garrison joined the National Guard, even applying for active duty with the Army in 1951, but because of recurring nightmares of past missions Garrison was then relieved of duty by the Army. Remaining in the Guard when it became apparent that he suffered from shell shock due to his numerous bombing missions flown during World War II,[8] leading one Army doctor to conclude that Garrison had a “severe and disabling psychoneurosis” which “interfered with his social and professional adjustment to a marked degree. He was considered totally incapacitated from the standpoint of military duty and moderately incapacitated in civilian adaptability.”[9] Yet, when his record was reviewed further by the U.S. Army Surgeon General, he “found him to be physically qualified for federal recognition in the national army.”[10] Upon returning again to civilian life, Garrison worked in several different trial lawyer positions before winning election as New Orleans District Attorney, starting with his first of three terms in January 1962.[7]

District attorney[edit]

In the years prior to winning office as New Orleans District Attorney in 1961, Garrison worked for the New Orleans law firm of Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles from 1954 to 1958, before he first became an assistant district attorney. Garrison became a flamboyant, colorful, well-known figure in New Orleans but was initially unsuccessful in his run for public office. He lost a 1959 election for criminal court judge. In 1961, he ran for district attorney and won against incumbent Richard Dowling by 6,000 votes in a five-man Democratic primary. Despite lack of major political backing, his performance in a television debate and last-minute television commercials facilitated his victory.

Once in office, Garrison cracked down on prostitution and the abuses of Bourbon Street bars and strip joints. He indicted Dowling and one of his assistants for criminal malfeasance, but the charges were dismissed for lack of evidence. Garrison did not appeal. Garrison received national attention for a series of vice raids in the French Quarter, staged sometimes on a nightly basis. Newspaper headlines in 1962 praised Garrison’s efforts, “Quarter Crime Emergency Declared by Police, DA. – Garrison Back, Vows Vice Drive to Continue – 14 Arrested, 12 more nabbed in Vice Raids.” Garrison’s critics often point out that many of the arrests made by his office did not result in convictions, implying that he was in the habit of making arrests without evidence. However, assistant DA William Alford has said that charges would, more often than not, be reduced or dropped if a relative of someone charged gained Garrison’s ear. Alford said Garrison had “a heart of gold.”[11]

After a conflict with local criminal judges over his budget, he accused them of racketeering and conspiring against him. The eight judges charged him with misdemeanor criminal defamation, and Garrison was convicted in January 1963. In 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction and struck down the state statute as unconstitutional.[12] At the same time, Garrison indicted Judge Bernard Cocke with criminal malfeasance and, in two trials prosecuted by Garrison himself, Cocke was acquitted.

Garrison charged nine policemen with brutality, but dropped the charges two weeks later. At a press conference, he accused the state parole board of accepting bribes, but could obtain no indictments. Critical of the state legislature, Garrison was unanimously censured by it for “deliberately maligning all of the members”.[13]

In 1965, running for reelection against Judge Malcolm O’Hara, Garrison won with 60 percent of the vote.

Kennedy assassination investigation[edit]

As New Orleans D.A. in late 1966, Garrison began an investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, after receiving several tips from Jack Martin that a man named David Ferrie may have been involved in the assassination.[14] The result of Garrison’s investigation was the arrest and trial of New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw in 1969, with Shaw being unanimously acquitted less than one hour after the case went to the jury.[15][16][17]

Garrison was able to subpoena the Zapruder film from Life magazine. Thus, members of the American public – i.e., the jurors of the case – were shown the movie for the first time. Until the trial, the film had rarely been seen, and copies were made by assassination investigator Steve Jaffe, who was working with Garrison’s office. In 2015, Garrison’s lead investigator’s daughter released his copy of the film, along with a number of his personal papers from the investigation.[18]

Garrison’s key witness against Shaw was Perry Russo, a 25-year-old insurance salesman from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. At the trial, Russo testified that he had attended a party at anti-Castro activist David Ferrie‘s apartment. At the party, Russo said that Lee Harvey Oswald (who Russo said was introduced to him as “Leon Oswald”), David Ferrie, and “Clem Bertrand” (who Russo identified in the courtroom as Clay Shaw) had discussed killing President Kennedy.[19] The conversation included plans for the “triangulation of crossfire” and alibis for the participants.[19]

Russo’s version of events has been questioned by some historians and researchers, such as Patricia Lambert, once it became known that part of his testimony might have been induced by hypnosis and by the drug sodium pentothal (sometimes called “truth serum”).[20] An early version of Russo’s testimony (as told in Assistant D.A. Andrew Sciambra’s memo, before Russo was subjected to sodium pentothal and hypnosis) fails to mention an “assassination party” and says that Russo met Shaw on two occasions, neither of which occurred at the party.[21][22] However, in his book On the Trail of the Assassins, Garrison says that Russo had already discussed the party at Ferrie’s apartment before any “truth serum” was administered.[23] Scambria said that the party information was simply accidentally left off the notes of his encounter with Russo. Throughout his life, Russo reiterated the same account of being present for a party at Ferrie’s house along with the Mr. Bertrand where the subject of Kennedy’s potential assassination had come up.[24][25]

Garrison defended his conduct regarding witness testimony, stating:

Before we introduced the testimony of our witnesses, we made them undergo independent verifying tests, including polygraph examination, truth serum and hypnosis. We thought this would be hailed as an unprecedented step in jurisprudence; instead, the press turned around and hinted that we had drugged our witnesses or given them posthypnotic suggestions to testify falsely.[26]

In January 1968, Garrison subpoenaed Kerry Wendell Thornley – an acquaintance of Oswald’s from their days in the military – to appear before a grand jury, questioning him about his relationship with Oswald and his knowledge of other figures Garrison believed to be connected to the assassination.[27] Thornley sought a cancellation of this subpoena on which he had to appear before the Circuit Court.[28] Garrison charged Thornley with perjury after Thornley denied that he had been in contact with Oswald in any manner since 1959. The perjury charge was eventually dropped by Garrison’s successor Harry Connick Sr.

During Garrison’s 1973 bribery trial, tape recordings from March 1971 revealed that Garrison considered publicly implicating former United States Air Force General and Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Charles Cabell of conspiracy in the assassination of Kennedy after learning he was the brother of Earle Cabell, the Dallas mayor in 1963.[29] Theorizing that a plot to kill the president was masterminded out of New Orleans in conjunction with the CIA with cooperation from the Dallas police department and city government, allegedly Garrison tasked his former chief investigator, Pershing Gervais, to look into the possibility that General Cabell had stayed in the city’s Fontainebleau Motel at the time of the assassination.[29] The Washington Post reported that there was no evidence that Gervais ever followed through with the request and that there was no further mention of General Cabell in Garrison’s investigation. The article also notes that by this date in question Gervais was no longer working for the district attorney in New Orleans.[29]

U.S. talk radio host David Mendelsohn conducted a comprehensive interview with Garrison which was broadcast in 1988 by KPFA in Berkeley, California. Alongside Garrison, the program featured the voices of Lee Harvey Oswald and JFK filmmaker Oliver Stone. Garrison explains that cover stories were circulated in an attempt to blame the killing on the Cubans and the Mafia but that he blames the conspiracy to kill the president firmly on the CIA who wanted to continue the Cold War.[30] The very same reasonings as to why he thought JFK was killed were espoused by Garrison in filmed television appearances he would also make leading up to his death, the next year after Stone’s release of his cinematic film JFK, largely based on Garrison’s pioneering role in the lone attempt over time to prosecute in the case of President Kennedy‘s assassination.

Later career and death[edit]

In 1973, Garrison was tried and found not guilty by the jury for accepting bribes to protect illegal pinball machine operations.[31] In an interview conducted by New Orleans reporter Rosemary James with Pershing Gervais, Gervais had admitted to concocting the charges.[32]

In the same year, Garrison was defeated for reelection as district attorney by Harry Connick Sr. On April 15, 1978, Garrison won a special election over a Republican candidate, Thomas F. Jordan, for Louisiana’s 4th Circuit Court of Appeal judgeship, a position for which he was later reelected and which he held until his death.[33]

In 1987, Garrison appeared in the film The Big Easy where he essentially played himself, and the next year he was featured in The Men Who Killed Kennedy series, airing in the United States beginning in 1988.

After the Shaw trial, Garrison wrote three books on the Kennedy assassination, A Heritage of Stone (1970), The Star Spangled Contract (1976, fiction, but based on the JFK assassination), and his best-seller, On the Trail of the Assassins (1988). A Heritage of Stone, published by Putnam, places responsibility for the assassination on the CIA and says the Warren Commission, the Executive Branch, members of the Dallas Police Department, the pathologists at Bethesda, and various others lied to the American public.[34] The book does not mention Shaw or Garrison’s investigation of Shaw.[34]

Garrison’s investigation received widespread attention through Oliver Stone‘s film, JFK (1991),[35] which was largely based on Garrison’s book as well as Jim MarrsCrossfire: The Plot That Killed Kennedy.[36][37] Kevin Costner played a fictionalized version of Garrison in the movie. Garrison himself had a small on-screen role in the film, playing United States Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren. Garrison also appears live and comments on the Shaw Trial in the documentary The JFK Assassination: The Jim Garrison Tapes, written and directed by actor John Barbour.

Garrison died in 1992, survived by his five children.[38][39] He is interred at Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans.[40]

Legacy[edit]

Political analyst and conspiracy believer Carl Oglesby was quoted as saying, “… I have done a study of Garrison: I come out of it thinking that he is one of the really first-rate class-act heroes of this whole ugly story [the killing of John F. Kennedy and subsequent investigation].”[41]

Garrison’s investigation and trial of Shaw has been described by critics as “a fatally flawed case built on flimsy evidence that featured a chorus of dubious and even wacky witnesses.”[42] Political commentator George Will wrote that Garrison “staged an assassination ‘investigation’ that involved recklessness, cruelty, abuse of power, publicity mongering and dishonesty, all on a scale that strongly suggested lunacy leavened by cynicism.”[43] Former Orleans Parish district attorney Harry Connick Sr. said it was “a travesty of justice”[42] and that he “thought it was one of the grossest, most extreme miscarriages of justice in the annals of American judicial history.”[44] Journalist Max Holland also described the investigation of Shaw as an “egregious miscarriage of justice”.[45] Others who have called Garrison’s case against Shaw a “miscarriage of justice” or “travesty of justice” include historian Alecia Long[46] and journalist Gerald Posner.[47] Conspiracy researcher Harold Weisberg called it a “tragedy”.[48]

Conspiracy author David Lifton called Garrison “intellectually dishonest, a reckless prosecutor, and a total charlatan”.[49] At the time, Garrison came under criticism from author and researcher Sylvia Meagher, who in 1967 wrote:

… as the Garrison investigation continued to unfold, it gave cause for increasingly serious misgivings about the validity of his evidence, the credibility of his witnesses, and the scrupulousness of his methods.[50]

According to Shaw’s defense team, witnesses, including Russo, claimed to have been bribed and threatened with perjury and contempt of court charges by Garrison in order to make his case against Shaw.[51]

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1986 The Big Easy Judge
1991 JFK Earl Warren (final film role)

See also The Garrison Tapes: A John Barbour Film https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ocfr2VdcpU

Limitations in Garrisons case against Clay Shaw

Jim Garrison with interference from the FBI and J. Edgar Hoover led a prosecution of Clay Shaw he believed (as I do now) tied to the assassination of JFK.

It is most likely the prosecution failed for two three reasons.

  1. FBI Interference : The FBI denounced Garrison and the prosecution and the arrest of Ferrie and others tied to the case against Shaw. Ferrie would be endangered by leaks and killed bfore the trial. The US Government falsified witness statements including an important statement that Jack Ruby knew each other from Ruby’s adult entertaiment club in Texas which Oswald was at least once associating with Ruby

  2. The loss of witnesses : Many potential witnesses were not available because they had died since the assassination years earlier, during it, and even contemporenous with the prosecution such as Robert F. Kennedy who may have and input or recognized matters being testified to.

  3. The Prosecution theory may have been inexact : The available data at the time of the court case was limited. The CIA (including James Jesus Angleton) and J. Edgar Hoover had not disclosed the CIA FBI NSA DOD Secret Service Marine Corps based activities of Oswlad or Shaw. It now seems Operation Pluto was to create a strop to the left government, provisional government of Cuba with Operation Mongoose creating the rebellion for a provisional government such as Ted Cruz Sr than after Evangelicals were in place a next generation of British Feudal tied families groomed for Indonesia (Obama under Suherto, Rafael Cruz Jr under Raphael Cruz Sr.) would be CIA backed governments

The absence of Texas

The assassination of JFK was a national matter without specific National jurisdiction (many crimes can be charged under the jurisdiction of the Commerce Clause as part of interstate commerce such as a traveling person from out of state) but in fact the presence of Shaw, David Ferrie, and government operations in Louisiana gave jurisdictional access of the suspect, Clay Shaw to Louisianan prosecutor Garrison.

Operation Mongoose, arming and creating an Cuban refugees and mafia cartel hoard to invade Cuba and invite the US Military in as protector of the provisional government came from the Texas George H.W. Bush and long-term Texan conspirator LBJ, and Rockefeller of Arkansas, Dean Rusk oil business and its politicians under William King Harvey and General Edward Geary Lansdale , a US Air Force officer who retired in 1963 and the two of those figures a Secret Team of rouge acts which included the assassination of foreign leaders and figures within the United States itself.

The Texas support for the Shadow Government operation and National support for those figures, those figures operationally supporting J. Edgar Hoover and James Angleton, George H.W. Bush, and LBJ, and the then CIA of the time made access to crime scene and law enforcement where the crime occurred a far reach from Louisiana and the formation of the Louisiana case against its suspects difficult.

James Carothers Garrison Born: November 20, 1921, Denison, IA Died: October 21, 1992, New Orleans, LA

James Carothers Garrison (born Earling Carothers Garrison; November 20, 1921 October 21, 1992)[2] was the District Attorney of Orleans Parish, Louisiana, from 1962 to 1973. A member of the Democratic Party, he is best known for his investigations into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and prosecution of New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to that effect in 1969, which ended in Shaw’s acquittal. The author of three books, one became a prime source for Oliver Stone’s film JFK in 1991, in which Garrison was portrayed by actor Kevin Costner, while Garrison himself also made a cameo as Earl Warren.


Five US Espionage Agencies under J. Edgar Hoover in cash-for-crimes mafia corruption racket killed his witness David Ferrie who was needed to convict Clay Shaw who was needed to out George H.W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Felix Rodrigues or said another way, Zapata Oil and the Saudi Royal Family tied to QEII.

Clay LaVerne Shaw, moving Blue Hyndrangea out to the world?

The Garrison Tapes: A John Barbour Film *

Shaw, a native of Kentwood, Louisiana, was the son of Glaris Lenora Shaw,[2] a United States Marshal, and Alice Shaw. His grandfather had been the sheriff of Tangipahoa Parish. When Shaw was five, his family moved to New Orleans, where he eventually attended Warren Easton High School.

Glaris Lenora Shaw. Birth. 25 Nov 1887. Kentwood, Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, United States of America. Death. 25 Nov 1966

Clay Shaw served as an officer in the United States Army during World War II. He served as secretary to the General Staff and later served in Europe. He was decorated by three nations: the United States with the Legion of Merit and Bronze Star, by France with the Croix de Guerre and named Chevalier de l’Ordre du Merite, and by Belgium named Knight of the Order of the Crown of Belgium. Shaw was honorably discharged from the United States Army as a major in 1946.[4]

Clay Shaw knew of MKULTRA, the Eugenics, its tie to the Manattan Project, and the ongoign work at Tulane University backed by the Mafia for profit businesses he was in including black market Eugenics.

It is my (Edward Donegan’s) assertion David Ferrie was likely in on the overall plot as assisting the plant of a future President, Ted Cruz JR., a groomed sleeper agent born of Mary’s Lab, though he may not have know of a plan to assasinate JFK or Castro in Ferrie’s own time.

Fairhope man shares father’s brush with JFK assassin Lee Harvey Oswald retrieved from https://www.fox10tv.com/ and copied or modified to here

The FBI questioned Ferrie just five days after the assassination. Some of his answers have been grist for conspiracy theories. For instance, he acknowledged being greatly upset by the failure of Kennedy to support the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba by anti-communist rebels and admitted that he “might have used an off-hand or colloquial expression ‘He ought to be shot,’” according to the FBI report.

The report also states that Ferrie acknowledged criticizing Kennedy’s habit of riding in convertibles, stating that “anyone could hide in the bushes and shoot a president.”

But Ferrie denied actually wanting Kennedy dead and told FBI agents that he never had met Oswald.

During the 1950s, Ferrie was an instructor in the Civil Air Patrol, a congressionally chartered corporation that serves as a civilian auxiliary of the Air Force. He also was active during the 1960s in an anti-communist organization called the Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Front. He told investigators that he helped collect food, money, medicine and clothing for the organization.

Waters said New Orleans at the time was known as a city where it was relatively easy to get through customs. He said CIA types and the Mafia would approach pilots to fly “special missions” for them.

“A number of those guys kind of got hooked into,” he said, pausing, “something. My dad said he was approached a couple of times. And he just totally avoided it.”

Waters said his father was convinced three or four pilots flew “unknown characters” in and out of Dallas, where the JFK assassination took place.

The Arrest of Clay Shaw By Rebecca Poole & Connie Gentry
https://neworleanshistorical.org/items/show/1487

On November 23, 1963, the day after the assassination, Oswald had been formally accused of assassinating Kennedy. Garrison, along with many Americans, found it hard to believe that Oswald acted alone. In 1966, Garrison began an investigation linking Oswald to two New Orleanians, David Ferrie and Clay Shaw. Ferrie was linked to Oswald through a 1955 photo that showed Ferrie and Oswald at a social event as members of the Civil Air Patrol. A dubious eyewitness, under Garrison’s interrogation, recalled that he had heard Ferrie, Oswald, and Shaw discussing an assassination plot at a party hosted in Ferrie’s home. Additionally, Garrison believed Shaw to be the unidentified “Clay Bertrand [Russell] ” who, the day after the assassination, had phoned a New Orleans attorney requesting that the attorney represent Oswald.

Belgium is a sovereign state and a federal constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system.

Belgium,[A] officially the Kingdom of Belgium,[B] is a country in Western Europe. It is bordered by the Netherlands to the north, Germany to the east, Luxembourg to the southeast, France to the southwest, and the North Sea to the northwest. It covers an area of 30,689 km2 (11,849 sq mi) and has a population of more than 11.5 million, making it the 22nd most densely populated country in the world and the 6th most densely populated country in Europe, with a density of 376 per square kilometre (970/sq mi). The capital and largest city is Brussels; other major cities are Antwerp, Ghent, Charleroi, Liège, Bruges, Namur, and Leuven.

German forces again invaded the country in May 1940, and 40,690 Belgians, over half of them Jews, were killed during the subsequent occupation and The Holocaust. From September 1944 to February 1945 the Allies liberated Belgium. After World War II, a general strike forced King Leopold III to abdicate in 1951 in favour of his son, Prince Baudouin, since many Belgians felt he had collaborated with Germany during the war.[40] The Belgian Congo gained independence in 1960 during the Congo Crisis;[41] Ruanda-Urundi followed with its independence two years later. Belgium joined NATO as a founding member and formed the Benelux group of nations with the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Belgium became one of the six founding members of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1951 and of the European Atomic Energy Community and European Economic Community, established in 1957. The latter has now become the European Union, for which Belgium hosts major administrations and institutions, including the European Commission, the Council of the European Union and the extraordinary and committee sessions of the European Parliament.

According to Garrison, Bertrand was Shaw’s alias in the New Orleans gay society. (In his investigation Garrison often exploited Shaw’s purported sexual preferences and his private life.)

It was this liason based clutch in which J. Edgar Hoover recruited underground operatives himself transsexual.

http://www.auxbeacon.org adds update: In 1979, Richard Helms, then a former director of the CIA, will testify under oath that Clay L. Shaw had been a part-time contact of the Domestic Contact Service of the CIA, where Shaw volunteered information from his travels abroad, mostly to Latin America.

In 1996, the CIA revealed that Clay Shaw, tried in February 1969 and acquitted for the assassination of JFK, had obtained a “five Agency” clearance in 1949.


In 1979, Richard Helms, former Director of the CIA, testified under oath that Shaw had been a part-time contact of the Domestic Contact Service (DCS) of the CIA, where Shaw volunteered information from his travels abroad, mostly to Latin America.[28] Like Shaw, 150,000 Americans (businessmen, and journalists, etc.) had provided such information to the DCS by the mid-1970s “on a nonclandestine basis” and that “such acts of cooperation should not be confused with an actual Agency relationship”.

In popular culture

Tommy Lee Jones portrayed Shaw in Oliver Stone’s 1991 film JFK.[30] He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for the role.

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia


James Carothers Garrison (born Earling Carothers Garrison; November 20, 1921 – October 21, 1992)[2] was the District Attorney of Orleans Parish, Louisiana, from 1962 to 1973. A member of the Democratic Party, he is best known for his investigations into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and prosecution of New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to that effect in 1969, which ended in Shaw’s acquittal.

As New Orleans D.A. in late 1966, Garrison began an investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, after receiving several tips from Jack Martin that a man named David Ferrie may have been involved in the assassination. The end result of Garrison’s investigation was the arrest and trial of New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw in 1969, with Shaw being unanimously acquitted less than one hour after the case went to the jury though after David Ferrir, co-operating witness against Clay Shaw had been murdered.

David Ferrie lived in the upstairs of this two story house located on Louisiana Avenue Parkway in the Broadmoor section of New Orleans – Photo by Infrogmation

Ferrie was born in Cleveland, Ohio. A Roman Catholic, Ferrie attended St. Ignatius High School, John Carroll University, St. Mary’s Seminary, where he studied for the priesthood, and Baldwin Wallace College. He next spent three years at the St. Charles Seminary in Carthagena, Ohio. He suffered from alopecia areata, a skin condition, which results in hair loss and whose severity may increase with age. Later in life, to compensate for his hair loss, Ferrie wore a homemade auburn wig and false eyebrows.

In 1944 Ferrie left St. Charles because of “emotional instability.”

Perry RussoRusso was an insurance salesman from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He attended Tulane University, received a bachelor’s degree from Loyola University New Orleans in 1964, and attended one year of law school at Loyola.[2][3] He moved away from New Orleans in September 1965.[3] Russo came forward after his friend David Ferrie died on February 22, 1967, while being investigated by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison in regard to Kennedy’s death. “Dr. Mary’s Monkey: How the Unsolved Murder of a Doctor, a Secret Laboratory in New Orleans and Cancer-Causing Monkey Viruses are Linked to Lee Harvey … Assassination and Emerging Global Epidemics Paperback April 1, 2007” [Obama reating Eugenics and Cloning Research


The animal model often uses primates for research. this includes fertility studies especially as semi erect animals can more closely approximate movement and ovulation, fertilizations, etc.,

He obtained a pilot’s license and began teaching aeronautics at Cleveland’s Benedictine High School. He was fired from the school for several infractions, including taking boys to a house of prostitution.[5] He then became an insurance inspector and, in 1951, moved to New Orleans where he worked as a pilot for Eastern Air Lines, until losing his job in August 1961, after being arrested twice on morals charges.

Ferrie was involved with the Civil Air Patrol in several ways: He started as a Senior Member (an adult member) with the Fifth Cleveland Squadron at Hopkins Airport in 1947.[7] When he moved to New Orleans, he transferred to the New Orleans Cadet Squadron at Lakefront Airport.

There he served as an instructor, and later as the Commander.[7] After a Ferrie-trained cadet pilot perished in a December 1954 crash, Ferrie’s annual re-appointment was declined. He was asked to be a guest aerospace education instructor at a smaller squadron at Moisant Airport, and lectured there from June to September 1955. On July 27, 1955, 15-year-old Lee Harvey Oswald joined this squadron.

In March 1958, a former cadet-turned-commander invited Ferrie back to the New Orleans Cadet Squadron. Ferrie served unofficially for a time and was reinstated as Executive Officer in September 1959. Ferrie quit the squadron in June 1960 after a disagreement during a bivouac. In September 1960, he started his own unofficial squadron, called the Metairie Falcon Cadet Squadron.

Anti Castro (led by Geroge H.W. Bush and E Howard Hunt) Connection

An offshoot of this group was the Internal Mobile Security Unit, a group formed for the fight against Fidel Castro’s Cuba.[10] Over the years, he used both his official and unofficial squadrons to develop improper relations with boys ranging in age from 14 to 18, and his August 1961 arrests caused the Falcons to fold.

During Garrison’s own 1973 bribery trial, tape recordings from March 1971 revealed that Garrison considered publicly implicating former United States Air Force General and Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Charles Cabell of conspiracy in the assassination of Kennedy after learning he was the brother of Earle Cabell, the Dallas mayor in 1963.

Ferrie initially supported Fidel Castro’s campaign against Fulgencio Batista in Cuba, but by mid-1959 became convinced that Castro was a Communist. According to the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations, Ferrie “found an outlet for his political fanaticism in the anti-Castro movement.” By early 1961, Ferrie was working with right-wing Cuban exile Sergio Arcacha Smith, head of the Central Intelligence Agency-backed Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Front in New Orleans. Ferrie soon became Arcacha Smith’s “eager partner in counterrevolutionary activities.” Both were involved in a raid in late 1961 on a munitions depot in Houma, Louisiana, “in which various weapons, grenades and ammunition were stolen.”

Ferrie admitted to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, after the assassination, that when speaking about Kennedy, he might have used the expression: “He ought to be shot.” Ferrie insisted, however, that these words were just “an off-hand or colloquial expression.”

In the early 1960s, Ferrie became involved with Guy Banister, former Special Agent In Charge (SAC) of the Chicago office of the FBI, right-wing political activist, segregationist, and private investigator. Banister also worked with Ferrie’s associate, Sergio Arcacha Smith. In early 1962, both Banister and Arcacha Smith maintained offices in the Newman Building at the corner address of 544 Camp Street / 531 Lafayette Street, New Orleans.

As Garrison continued his investigation, he became convinced that a group of right-wing extremists, including Ferrie, Banister, and Clay Shaw, were involved in a conspiracy with elements of the CIA to kill John F. Kennedy. Garrison later claimed that the motive for the assassination was anger over Kennedy’s attempts to obtain a peace settlement in both Cuba and Vietnam.[34][35] Garrison also believed that Shaw, Banister, and Ferrie had conspired to set up Oswald as a patsy in the JFK assassination.[36]

Ferrie’s autopsy was performed by Orleans Parish coroner Nicholas Chetta and pathologist Ronald A. Welsh. They concluded that there was no evidence of suicide or murder and that Ferrie died of a massive cerebral hemorrhage due to a congenital intracranial berry aneurysm that had ruptured at the base of his brain.[37][41][42][43] Upon learning of the coroner’s findings, Garrison said, “ suppose it could just be a weird coincidence that the night Ferrie penned two suicide notes, he died of natural causes.“[34] On March 1, 1967, Garrison had Shaw arrested and charged him with conspiring to assassinate Kennedy.

Viola June Cobb was born on August 24, 1927 in Ponca City, Oklahoma to Jasper E. Cobb and Jesse Lois Sharp.[1] She graduated from Ponca City High School, and went on to attend University of Oklahoma for one year[2] in the mid-1940s.[3] She then worked at a Ponca City radio station and for a local newspaper as a courthouse reporter.[2] She was an adjunct of the Civil Air Patrol squadron in Norman, Oklahoma, attaining the rank of 2nd class Lieutenant.

CIA recruitment CIA agent Harry Hermsdorf, undercover as a European journalist in Cuba, first met Cobb in the Havana Hilton’s hotel coffee shop while having coffee with Jorge Losada, the editor of Vision, a Latin American magazine. Losada introduced Cobb to Hermsdorf, who was using the alias Heinrich Heubner. Following a brief conversation, Cobb agreed to arrange meetings with Cuban officials for Hermsdorf and Der Spiegel correspondent Claus Jacobi.[24]

From May 24-26, 1960, Cobb met with Hermsdorf, who evaluated her at her hotel. Without mentioning the CIA, he offered her a long-term employment opportunity and invited her to meet him somewhere outside of Cuba. They arranged to meet at the Drake Hotel in New York on June 3.[5] Cobb traveled to the United States in early June 1960. She also stopped in Washington, D.C., where she stayed at the Raleigh Hotel. The CIA arranged surveillance of her hotel room and of a polygraph that she took.

What Could a Mysterious U.S. Spy Know About the JFK Assassination? retrieved from Politico Magazinek and copied or modified to here

[It appears to Edward Donegan it wa Civil Air Patrol and Waldorf Historia history]

Philip Shenon, a former Washington and foreign correspondent for the New York Times, is author of, mostly recently, A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination.

She may have been one of the bravest and best-placed American spies in the history of the Cold War, but few people outside the CIA know the mysterious story of June Cobb.

The existing information in the spy agency’s declassified files depicts Cobb as an American Mata Hari-an adventure-loving, death-defying globetrotter who moved to Cuba to work for Fidel Castro, the country’s newly installed strongman, then found herself recruited to spy for the CIA after growing disenchanted with Castro’s revolution. The era’s rampant sexism is obvious in her job evaluation reports: Cobb’s CIA handlers wrote down speculation about her sex life and her failed romance in the 1950s with an opium farmer in the jungles of South America. And the reports are filled with appraisals of Cobb’s looks, noting especially her fetching blue eyes. “Miss Cobb is not unattractive,” her CIA recruiter wrote in 1960. “She is blonde, has a slender figure, although she has a somewhat hard look, making her appear somewhat older than her 33 years.”

According to another, undated evaluation, she had a “wiry” figure but had been attractive enough to catch the Cuban dictator’s eye. Cobb, the report said, was reputedly “a former girlfriend of Castro’s.” True or not, she was close enough to get a job on the Cuban dictator’s senior staff in Havana in 1960, the perfect perch to spy for the CIA. Cobb’s agency work in Havana and later in Mexico leads us to the most puzzling aspect of her life-that she later found herself drawn deeply into the mysteries of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. After the murder, she reported to her CIA bosses that she had identified a trio of witnesses who could tie Kennedy’s assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, to Cuban diplomats and spies in Mexico City, where Oswald had traveled just weeks before the assassination.

What did June Cobb know at the time? Historians of the Cold War-and anyone with an interest in JFK’s 1963 assassination and the possibility of Cuban involvement-are on the verge of learning much more about the extraordinary, often bizarre, sometimes tragic life of the American spy who was born Viola June Cobb, the full name that appeared on her birth certificate back home in Ponca City, Oklahoma, in 1927. The National Archives has recently acknowledged that it is preparing to release a 221-page file of long-secret CIA documents about Cobb that-for reasons the Archives says it cannot yet divulge-are somehow linked to JFK’s murder.

The Cobb file is among the most tantalizing of an estimated 3,600 assassination-related documents scheduled to be made public by late October under the 25-year deadline established by the JFK Assassination Records Collection Act. Under the 1992 law, the full library of long-secret files will be released automatically by the National Archives later this year unless President Donald Trump blocks their release on national security grounds. The White House has not signaled what Trump, who for years has promoted mostly baseless conspiracy theories, including about JFK’s assassination, will do.

When JFK Won by Losing By THOMAS OLIPHANT and CURTIS WILKIE

What we know about Cobb so far comes largely from millions of pages of other documents from the CIA, FBI and other federal agencies that were declassified years ago under the 1992 law. Within those documents are dozens of files that identified Cobb as a paid CIA operative when she worked on Castro’s staff in Havana and later when she moved to Mexico. Some of the documents tie her to a lingering questions about Oswald’s trip to Mexico City in late September 1963, not long before Kennedy’s November assassination. In Mexico, Oswald came under CIA surveillance when he met there with both Soviet and Cuban spies. Previously released documents also show Cobb’s involvement in CIA surveillance of a U.S.-based pro-Castro group, the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, which Oswald championed in the months before Kennedy’s murder.

There is one document about Cobb that has remained completely off-limits to the public all these years: the 221-page file identified as “FOLDER ON COBB, VIOLA JUNE (VOL VII)” on a skeletal index released by the Archives last year. It is one of the 3,600 documents that were withheld from public view entirely in the 1990s at the request of the agencies that originally produced them-in Cobb’s case, the CIA. The index prepared by the Archives shows that, as of 1998, when her file was last officially reviewed, the spy agency said the document was “not believed relevant” to the Kennedy assassination but could do unspecified harm if made public before the October 2017 deadline.

But the history of the assassination has needed to be rewritten since the 1990s, in part because of the CIA’s documented duplicity, which raises the question of whether Cobb’s file could in fact be relevant. A 2013 report by the CIA’s in-house historian acknowledged that the agency had conducted a “benign cover-up” in the years immediately after Kennedy’s assassination in an effort to keep investigators focused on “what the Agency believed at the time was the ‘best truth’-that Lee Harvey Oswald, for as yet undetermined motives, had acted alone in killing John Kennedy.”

New Orleans DA Releases Suppressed CAP Oswald Photo retrieved from Auxbeacon News and copied or modified to here

Jim Garrison releases 1956 photo of Lee Harvey Oswald proving membership in Civil Air Patrol

By New Orleans States-Item DA Releases ‘Suppressed’ Oswald Photo

District Attorney Jim Garrison has released a photograph of Lee Harvey Oswald in a Civil Air Patrol uniform, a picture he claims the federal government attempted to suppress. The photograph of Oswald, who was named the assassin of the late President John F. Kennedy by the Warren Commission, was distributed yesterday afternoon during a press conference called by Garrison.

THE PHOTOGRAPH, Garrison asserted, proves that Oswald knew David W. Ferrie, whom he described as a “well known, literally famous adventurer in the CIA.” Garrison claims that Oswald, Ferrie and Clay L. Shaw conspired to assassinate President Kennedy. Shaw has been charged with conspiracy and was scheduled to go to trial June 11 here. A temporary restraining order issued by Federal District Judge Frederick J. R. Heebe Tuesday postponed the trial indefinitely.

FERRIE, WHO WAS a CAP commander here at one time, died just a few days after the DA’s probe of the assassination was made public. Shaw, a 55-year-old retired businessman, says he never knew Oswald or Ferrie.

The Warren Report, which Garrison has attacked, mentioned that Oswald “was briefly a member of the Civil Air Patrol.”

GARRISON SAID yesterday that it was when Oswald joined the CAP that he was inducted into the Central Intelligence Agency by Ferrie.

The DA said the photograph of Oswald was probably taken sometime between 1955 and 1957.

There have been assertions that Ferrie and Oswald were in CAP during the same period of time but that they never knew each other because they were in different squadrons. Garrison said, “Whether Oswald was in the New Orleans Squadron or the Moisant Squadron is unimportant, because the two groups met together.”

February 20, 1967 – District Attorney Jim Garrison claims Warren Commission was wrong

Earling Carothers Garrison was born in Denison, Iowa in 1921. He was the first child and only son of Earling R. Garrison and Jane Anne Robinson who divorced when he was two years old.[2] His family moved to New Orleans in his childhood, where he was raised by his divorced mother. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II, having joined the year before the attacks on Pearl Harbor. After the war he obtained a law degree from Tulane University Law School in 1949. He then worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for two years where he was stationed with the Seattle office

Early life and career

Earling Carothers Garrison was born in Denison, Iowa in 1921.[3][4][5] He was the first child and only son of Earling R. Garrison and Jane Anne Robinson who divorced when he was two years old.[2] His family moved to New Orleans in his childhood, where he was raised by his divorced mother. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II, having joined the year before the attacks on Pearl Harbor. After the war he obtained a law degree from Tulane University Law School in 1949. He then worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for two years where he was stationed with the Seattle office.

Leading up to the Korean War era Garrison joined the National Guard, even applying for active duty with the Army in 1951, but because of recurring nightmares of past missions Garrison was then relieved of duty by the Army. Remaining in the Guard when it became apparent that he suffered from shell shock due to his numerous bombing missions flown during World War II,[7] leading one Army doctor to conclude that Garrison had a “severe and disabling psychoneurosis” which “interfered with his social and professional adjustment to a marked degree. He was considered totally incapacitated from the standpoint of military duty and moderately incapacitated in civilian adaptability”

Yet when his record was reviewed further by the U.S. Army Surgeon General, he “found him to be physically qualified for federal recognition in the national army.”[9] Upon returning again to civilian life, Garrison worked in several different trial lawyer positions before winning election as New Orleans District Attorney, starting with his first of three terms in January of 1962.

As Garrison continued his investigation, he became convinced that a group of right-wing extremists, including Ferrie, Banister, and Clay Shaw, were involved in a conspiracy with elements of the CIA to kill John F. Kennedy. Garrison later claimed that the motive for the assassination was anger over Kennedy’s attempts to obtain a peace settlement in both Cuba and Vietnam

On the afternoon of November 22, 1963 – the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated and the day Carlos Marcello was acquitted in his deportation case – New Orleans private investigator Guy Banister and one of his employees, Jack Martin, were drinking together at a local bar. On their return to Banister’s office, the two men got into a heated argument. According to Martin, Banister said something to which Martin replied, “What are you going to do – kill me like you all did Kennedy?” Banister drew his .357 magnum revolver and pistol-whipped Martin several times. Martin, badly injured, went by ambulance to Charity Hospital.[17]

In the ensuing days, Jack Martin told reporters and authorities that Ferrie might have been involved in the assassination.

The New Orleans District Attorney, Mr. Jim Garrison, claimed that Lee Harvey Oswald was part of a conspiracy to assassinate the late President John F. Kennedy. He said his office has been conducting an investigation into what New Orleans newspapers say was an organised plot to kill Mr. Kennedy. He called the Warren Commission’s Report that Oswald acted alone wrong. He said the same for author William Manchester’s conclusions. Manchester wrote the recent controversial account of the assassination of President Kennedy and the immediate aftermath. The New Orleans District Attorney added he plans to arrest several persons on conspiracy charges. He refused to name names. Garrison did say, however, that some persons that his office is investigating are in danger of losing their lives

[two days later: SILENCED ! On February 22, 1967, less than a week after the New Orleans States-Item broke the story of Garrison’s investigation, Ferrie was found dead in his apartment

Martin told the New Orleans police that Ferrie “was supposed to have been the getaway pilot in the assassination.“[1] He said that Ferrie had threatened Kennedy’s life, even outlining plans to kill him, and that Ferrie might have taught Oswald how to use a rifle with a telescopic sight. Martin also claimed that Ferrie had known Oswald from their days in the New Orleans Civil Air Patrol, and that he had seen a photograph, at Ferrie’s home, of Oswald in a Civil Air Patrol group.[18]


You do not believe the Warren commission’s report is that correct?

That’s correct.

i believe that one commission was wrong and uh will be shown to be wrong mr garrison william manchester’s book he says oswald acted alone and there was no conspiracy and certainly this part of the book hasn’t been challenged by the kennedy family what is your reaction to manchester’s account.

well ed i i was not there at the assassination scene but i don’t think mr manchester was either and i think that my office has put many more hours looking into that matter than miss manchester and i would reply that uh i believe that mr manchester is wrong

mr garrison on the basis of what you’ve just said do you feel there should be a new investigation into the slaying of president kennedy at a level higher than yours as someone suggested a new federal investigation

well that actually i think that uh effective investigation by that i mean imaginative investigation in which there is effective evaluation and not simply the blind collection of volumes of evidence at every level is justified in a case like this i would have to answer yes except that i would hope that this time more premium would be placed on the evaluation function but of course it would be uh better if more agencies cooperated and gave each other information worked together a matter like this justifies a number of concurrent investigations is the investigation proceeding on the basis of what you’ve uncovered or what you think you will uncover our investigation is proceeding on the basis of what we have uncovered it is not based on uh supposition

do you believe that local publicity of facts of the investigation has put any witnesses life in jeopardy

uh i believe uh unfortunately that the irresponsible uh handling of this story by the newspapers yesterday and this morning in new orleans have placed the life of one witness in such jeopardy that i think there’s a real question about whether he will live or not do you believe sir that any new orleans residents were directly or indirectly involved in the assassination no comment mr garrison some names have been released on people that you have questioned uh particularly one person that you arrested uh 72 hours after the assassination as a fugitive from texas what comment do you have for this

my comment is that i think that the newspapers in mentioning the names of people whom we have not charged whose names we have not mentioned is very unfair to these people in spite of the fact that we are investigating a number of individuals in this country we presume that people are innocent until they are found guilty and these individuals have not even been charged and their names have been mentioned in the newspapers in such a way as to create damaging inferences


Dr. Mary’s Monkey: How the Unsolved Murder of a Doctor, a Secret Laboratory in New Orleans and Cancer-Causing Monkey Viruses are Linked to Lee Harvey … Assassination and Emerging Global Epidemics Paperback – April 1, 2007

The 1964 murder of a nationally known cancer researcher sets the stage for this gripping exposé of medical professionals enmeshed in covert government operations over the course of three decades. Following a trail of police records, FBI files, cancer statistics, and medical journals, this revealing book presents evidence of a web of medical secret-keeping that began with the handling of evidence in the JFK assassination and continued apace, sweeping doctors into cover-ups of cancer outbreaks, contaminated polio vaccine, the arrival of the AIDS virus, and biological weapon research using infected monkeys. This new edition includes a foreword from author Jim Marr.

Part of the series on the Jim Garrison investigation of the JFK assassination From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

What would gays, gay males, ever want access to for gay couples, and treat the stolen goods as ammunition, strength against competition?

Shaw served as an officer in the United States Army during World War II. He served as secretary to the General Staff and later served in Europe. He was decorated by three nations: the United States with the Legion of Merit and Bronze Star, by France with the Croix de Guerre and named Chevalier de l’Ordre du Merite, and by Belgium named Knight of the Order of the Crown of Belgium. Shaw was honorably discharged from the United States Army as a major in 1946.

After World War II Shaw helped start the International Trade Mart in New Orleans which facilitated the sales of both domestic and imported goods.

Stone cold truth the British killed JFK with Protestants helping

I am a firsthadn witness to one otherwise unexplained piece of this, sufficeint a letter to solve the phrase missiong most of ite letters and can explain many scenes in this movie as a first hand witness whose model of understanding offers synergizing consistent gap filling in the missing text of the partial prhase.

New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison prosecuted Clay Shaw on the charge that Shaw and a group of activists, including David Ferrie and Guy Banister, were involved in a conspiracy with elements of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the John F. Kennedy assassination. Garrison arrested Shaw on March 1, 1967. Garrison believed that Shaw was the man named as “Clay Bertrand” in the Warren Commission Report. Garrison said that Shaw used the alias “Clay Bertrand” in New Orleans’ gay society.

Kevin Costner plays Jim Garrison hobbled by dead witnesses and the assasinatio of RFK. He fails in the footsoldier battle of him against Claw Shaw, later found a CIA operative, but gains an indictment of the FBI, CIA, and US government hiding its corrupt acts. On YouTube One scene, an advert then the second part of the clip

The story is told starting with the death of Rose Cherami who I believe I can explain as a footsoldier of my “peoples” cause. Like many who knew of certain families carrying FOXP2 Minimal Brain Disorder and research of us and secret studies she was carrying news to JFK that the plan was to kill the FOXPs and use the non expressing family members for sleeper agents despite JFKs spite for the program. Further Reading

This was the very same Barrack Obama Jr planned by Free Mason Scotish Rites, the same Barrack Obama Jr taken to the White House nursery and groomed by the Chicago Trinity Baptist Church as a sleeper.

JFK (1991) retrieved from Wikipedia and copied or modified to here

Jim Garrison

This book

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